ABOUT: National Animal Telemetry Network

A national Animal Telemetry Network (ATN) will provide exciting and important short and long-term benefits, including enhancing fisheries and ecosystem-based management, filling oceanographic knowledge gaps and improving ocean modeling and forecasting, and advancing many of the National Ocean Policy (NOP) Implementation Plan priority objectives.

IOOS Animal Acoustic Telemetry (AAT) Data Project: Improving Access to AAT Observations

As part of the IOOS Animal Telemetry Network efforts, in 2012-2013 IOOS supported a community needs assessment and data-access standards and technology development project for animal acoustic telemetry (AAT) data. The AAT project was co-led by IOOS, NANOOS (the IOOS Regional Association for the Pacific Northwest), the Pacific Ocean Shelf Tracking Project (POST, which is no longer in operation), and the Ocean Tracking Network (OTN).

Strategic Plan And Recommendations for a National ATN through U.S. IOOS

Animal telemetry observations can inform federal and state resource managers through improved spatial models of animal dynamics, and improve the basis of conservation and sustainable-use fishery management policies. A national Animal Telemetry Network (ATN) through the U.S. Integrated Ocean Observing System (U.S. IOOS) will integrate a range of operational telemetry technologies that enable monitoring of a host of aquatic life over multiple temporal and spatial scales. A national ATN will provide exciting and important short and long-term benefits, including enhancing fisheries and ecosystem-based management, filling oceanographic knowledge gaps and improving ocean modeling and forecasting, and advancing many of the National Ocean Policy (NOP) Implementation Plan priority objectives.

Data Exchange Standard for Acoustic, Archival and Satellite Tags, Version 1.0

The purpose of this document is to describe the data and metadata template to use to share acoustic, archival and satellite telemetry data between organizations. The need for such a standard has become obvious due to a growing number of projects (e.g. TOPP, POST, AATAMS) collecting important volumes of data (Kranstauber et al. 2011, Campbell et al. 2015, Dwyer et al. 2015, Campbell et al. 2016), which are more likely to result in the publication of articles in high impact factor journals (Block et al. 2011, Hussey et al. 2015, Kays et al. 2015).